Perfect for rural living, Maremma Sheepdogs are large, loyal and protective family pets that needs lots of mental stimulation. Affectionately known as gentle giants, Maremma Sheepdogs originated in Italy where their primary job was to guard flocks against wolves, bears and wild dogs. Maremma Sheepdogs are known for their self-reliant, independent and protective temperament. They …


Begging is a bad habit, but many dog owners actually encourage it. This can lead to digestive problems and obesity. Dogs beg because they love food. However, table scraps are not treats, and food is not love. Yes, it is hard to resist that longing look, but giving in "just this once" creates a problem in the long run. When you teach your dog that begging is permitted, you are sending the wrong message.

Among canids, packs are the social units that hunt, rear young and protect a communal territory as a stable group and their members are usually related.[61] Members of the feral dog group are usually not related. Feral dog groups are composed of a stable 2-6 members compared to the 2-15 member wolf pack whose size fluctuates with the availability of prey and reaches a maximum in winter time. The feral dog group consists of monogamous breeding pairs compared to the one breeding pair of the wolf pack. Agonistic behavior does not extend to the individual level and does not support a higher social structure compared to the ritualized agonistic behavior of the wolf pack that upholds its social structure. Feral pups have a very high mortality rate that adds little to the group size, with studies showing that adults are usually killed through accidents with humans, therefore other dogs need to be co-opted from villages to maintain stable group size.[38]
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Punishment is operationally defined as an event that lowers the probability of the behavior that it follows. It is not "punishment" in the common sense of the word,[40] and does not mean physical or psychological harm and most certainly does not mean abuse. Punishment simply involves the presentation of an undesired consequence (positive punishment) when the wrong behavior is performed, such as a snap of the leash, or the removal of a desired consequence (negative punishment) when the wrong behavior is performed, such as the trainer eating the cheese that would have been the reward.[41] A behavior that has previously been developed may cease if reinforcement stops; this is called extinction. A dog that paws its owner for attention will eventually stop if it no longer receives attention.[42]
Dogs have become closely associated with humans through domestication and have also become sensitive to human communicative signals. Generally, they have a lot of exposure to human speech, especially during play, and are believed to have a good ability to recognize human speech. Two studies investigated the ability of a single dog that was believed to be exceptional in its understanding of language. Both studies revealed the potential for at least some dogs to develop an understanding of a large number of simple commands on the basis of just the sounds emitted by their owners. However the studies suggested that visual cues from the owner may be important for the understanding of more complex spoken commands.[77]
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The Pug is a fun loving, loyal and energetic dog. Distinguishable with their short muzzle face, they originate from China and were brought to Europe in the seventeenth century. Pugs are very popular in modern times and come in two colours of black and fawn and feature deep wrinkles on their face. With their good nature, they make great pets for families with children as they have a lot of personality for such a small dog.
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“My daughter relocated in another country and the foster care she had for the Shiba Inus didn't work out. I picked them up at short notice, not knowing anything about the breed, or much about dogs, being a multiple cat owner. Shiba Inu Savvy has made it possible to look after my daughter's dogs rather than take them to a shelter. It's been such a relief to have someone to turn to.”
"I thought I would drop you a line to let you know that after just 4 short sessions with my 8 week old Bloodhound pup 'Archie' he can now sit and stay on command and without hesitation. He also comes when he's called! Your step by step training lessons are so easy to understand for me and 'Archie.' I am so proud of him and myself. Your guide makes looking after him a real joy. Thank you so much."

In-home behavioural consultations are offered in the following areas of Melbourne: Keilor, Keilor Downs, East Keilor and surrounds, Taylor Lakes, Sydenham, Essendon, Strathmore, Moonee Ponds, Sunbury, Gisborne, Melton, Sunshine, Airport West, Tullamarine, Sunbury, Caroline Springs, Derrimut, Geelong, Ocean Grove, Corio, Torquay and Bellarine area. Country areas serviced incude: Kyneton, Malmsbury, Woodend, Romsey, Toolern Vale.
In 1935, the American Kennel Club began obedience trials, and in the following years popular magazines raised public awareness of the benefits of having a trained pet dog, and of the recreational possibilities of dog training as a hobby.[17] After WWII, the increasing complexities of suburban living demanded that for a pet dog's own protection and its owner's convenience, the dog should be obedient. William Koehler had served as principal trainer at the War Dog Training Center, in California, and after the war became chief trainer for the Orange Empire Dog Club—at the time, the largest dog club in the United States—instructor for a number of breed clubs, and a dog trainer for the Walt Disney Studios.[18] In 1962 Koehler published The Koehler Method of Dog Training, in which he is highly critical of what he calls "tid-bit training techniques" based in "the prattle of 'dog psychologists'".[17] Amongst the training innovations attributed to Koehler is the use of a long line in conjunction with a complete absence of oral communication as a way of instilling attentiveness prior to any leash training. Koehler insisted that participants in his training classes used "emphatic corrections", including leash jerks and throw chains, explaining that tentative, nagging corrections were cruel in that they caused emotional disturbance to the dog.[19] Vicki Hearne, a disciple of Koehler's, commented on the widespread criticism of his corrections, with the explanation that it was the emotionally loaded language used in the book that led to a number of court cases, and to the book being banned in Arizona for a time.[20] Despite the controversy, his basic method forms the core of many contemporary training systems.[21]
Punishment is operationally defined as an event that lowers the probability of the behavior that it follows. It is not "punishment" in the common sense of the word,[40] and does not mean physical or psychological harm and most certainly does not mean abuse. Punishment simply involves the presentation of an undesired consequence (positive punishment) when the wrong behavior is performed, such as a snap of the leash, or the removal of a desired consequence (negative punishment) when the wrong behavior is performed, such as the trainer eating the cheese that would have been the reward.[41] A behavior that has previously been developed may cease if reinforcement stops; this is called extinction. A dog that paws its owner for attention will eventually stop if it no longer receives attention.[42]

Anyway, My wife had 3 stuffed animals sitting on a bench long before we got the dogs. We had them for a while and the stuffed animals sat there. Well the reason I know the stuff works is after about a month of use , Jordan spotted the stuffed animals and wanted them. We were so thrilled that he saw them we let him have them even though the stuffed animals were in the family for a lot of years.


Lindsay says of this study, "Schilder and Van der Borg (2004) have published a report of disturbing findings regarding the short-term and long- term effects of shock used in the context of working dogs that is destined to become a source of significant controversy ... The absence of reduced drive or behavioral suppression with respect to critical activities associated with shock (e.g., bite work) makes one skeptical about the lasting adverse effects the authors claim to document. Although they offer no substantive evidence of trauma or harm to dogs, they provide loads of speculation, anecdotes, insinuations of gender and educational inadequacies, and derogatory comments regarding the motivation and competence of IPO trainers in its place." [64]
"Bloodhound Savvy was helpfull in that it gave me alot of information on a broad range of issues that I have been faced with as a first time dog owner. Ii have refered to it during different stages of my puppys development to make sure I am doing everything correctly and in the best possible way. It has help me quite a bit and I now have a well behaved and social Bloodhound I am very proud of."
Do talk to your local veterinary clinic and their nurses and veterinarians who have a wealth of knowledge and can help refer you to correct information. Remember that whilst some people may have never taken their pet to obedience school, if their dog is well adjusted it is likely it did not happen by magic. They, or the previous owner would have put in copious hours of home training and daily obedience exercises over some time, often early in the dog’s life. But don’t forget, old dogs can still learn new tricks!
I’ve noticed an interesting trend: people who have one badly behaved dog tend to have a badly behaved dog the next time too. And people who have a well-behaved dog tend to go on having well-behaved dogs. This is no coincidence: people tend to repeat the same actions, getting the same types of dogs, and treating them in similar ways. By observing this trend, I have a clearer understanding of why dogs behave badly, and what owners can do to avoid having a badly behaved dog.
A typical dog needs to be exercised for half an hour, twice daily. And being allowed out the back door to wander around the back garden does not count as exercise. Dogs need enough energetic, interesting exercise (visiting different places, meeting other animals, having the chance to run around off the leash). If they don’t get this, they end up frustrated, bored and prone to behaving badly.
Feral dogs are those dogs living in a wild state with no food and shelter intentionally provided by humans, and showing a continuous and strong avoidance of direct human contacts.[38] In the developing world pet dogs are uncommon, but feral, village or community dogs are plentiful around humans.[39] The distinction between feral, stray, and free ranging dogs is sometimes a matter of degree, and a dog may shift its status throughout its life. In some unlikely but observed cases, a feral dog that was not born wild but living with a feral group can become rehabilitated to a domestic dog with an owner. A dog can become a stray when it escapes human control, by abandonment or being born to a stray mother. A stray dog can become feral when forced out of the human environment or when co-opted or socially accepted by a nearby feral group. Feralization occurs through the development of a fear response to humans.[38]

The female dog can bear another litter within 8 months of the previous one. Dogs are polygamous in contrast to wolves that are generally monogamous. Therefore, dogs have no pair bonding and the protection of a single mate, but rather have multiple mates in a year. The consequence is that wolves put a lot of energy into producing a few pups in contrast to dogs that maximize the production of pups. This higher pup production rate enables dogs to maintain or even increase their population with a lower pup survival rate than wolves, and allows dogs a greater capacity than wolves to grow their population after a population crash or when entering a new habitat. It is proposed that these differences are an alternative breeding strategy, one adapted to a life of scavenging instead of hunting.[45]
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There are various things to consider, according to Radke, aside from a dog just being a family-friendly breed. She recommends taking your own daily life into account. "Are you an active family who spends a lot of time hiking, running, and camping?" she asks. "Or do you tend to stay home cooking and enjoying movies? You will want to choose a dog whose temperament, size, and energy level best matches your family."
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