Most dogs, like most humans, end up resembling their parents, not just in appearance but also in behaviour. Personalities of animals, just like people, are strongly controlled by genetics. If both parents are calm, obedient, gentle dogs, the puppies are more likely to turn out well. But if even just one parent is a boisterous, mischievous bundle of energy, then it’s more likely that a pup will grow into a similar type of animal. My simplest advice to people looking for a puppy is to try to meet both parents of the dog that you are considering.
Sometimes owners are confused when a dog approaches a human or another dog in a friendly fashion and then growls or snaps at them. These dogs may be motivated to approach chiefly to gain information, rather than to interact, and some may like strangers in principle, but nevertheless become anxious and overwhelmed all of a sudden. If you are seeing this pattern, call your dog away from new dogs and humans after a couple of seconds.
In 1848 W. N. Hutchinson published his book Dog Breaking: The Most Expeditious, Certain and Easy Method, Whether Great Excellence or Only Mediocrity Be Required, With Odds and Ends for Those Who Love the Dog and the Gun. Primarily concerned with training hunting dogs such as pointers and setters, the book advocates a form of reward-based training, commenting on men who have "a strong arm and a hard heart to punish, but no temper and no head to instruct" and suggesting "Be to his virtues ever kind. Be to his faults a little blind."[6] Stephen Hammond, a writer for Forest and Stream magazine, advocated in his 1882 book Practical Training that hunting dogs be praised and rewarded with meat for doing the correct behavior.[7]
Because you get force-free, easy to understand directions, troubleshooting guides, step-by-step guides, and pictures and video demonstrations you can use with any dog to quickly unlock his natural intelligence and eliminate bad behaviors. Quite literally I’ve compressed years of study of hundreds of problem dogs into a ‘paint-by numbers’ system for creating the wonderfully well-behaved pet you desire. I will show you why the formula is structured the way it is without wasting a moment of your valuable time.

Resource guarding is exhibited by many canines, and is one of the most commonly reported behaviour issues to canine professionals.[50] It is seen when a dog uses specific behaviour patterns so that they can control access to an item, and the patterns are flexible when people are around.[51] If a canine places value on some resource (i.e. food, toys, etc.) they may attempt to guard it from other animals as well as people, which leads to behavioural problems if not treated. The guarding can show in many different ways from rapid ingestion of food to using the body to shield items. It manifests as aggressive behaviour including, but not limited to, growling, barking, or snapping. Some dogs will also resource guard their owners and can become aggressive if the behaviour is allowed to continue. Owners must learn to interpret their dog's body language in order to try to judge the dog's reaction, as visual signals are used (i.e. changes in body posture, facial expression, etc.) to communicate feeling and response.[50] These behaviours are commonly seen in shelter animals, most likely due to insecurities caused by a poor environment. Resource guarding is a concern since it can lead to aggression, but research has found that aggression over guarding can be contained by teaching the dog to drop the item they are guarding.[51]


Most dogs, like most humans, end up resembling their parents, not just in appearance but also in behaviour. Personalities of animals, just like people, are strongly controlled by genetics. If both parents are calm, obedient, gentle dogs, the puppies are more likely to turn out well. But if even just one parent is a boisterous, mischievous bundle of energy, then it’s more likely that a pup will grow into a similar type of animal. My simplest advice to people looking for a puppy is to try to meet both parents of the dog that you are considering.
“Until I read Bloodhound Savvy I didn’t realize quite how important pack hierarchy is to Bloodhounds – or how easy it is to allow them to be top dog! Since we’ve been following your advice, Scout has been a completely different dog. We have made more progress in the last week that we have been using your techniques than in the last 4 months of puppy classes.”
Dog aggression is exhibited by growling, snarling, showing teeth, lunging, and biting. It is important to know that any dog has the potential to become aggressive, regardless of breed or history. However, dogs with violent or abusive histories and those bred from dogs with aggressive tendencies are much more likely to exhibit aggressive behavior towards people or other dogs. Reasons for aggression are basically the same as the reasons a dog will bite or snap, but overall canine aggression is a much more serious problem.
In 2012, a study found that dogs oriented toward their owner or a stranger more often when the person was pretending to cry than when they were talking or humming. When the stranger pretended to cry, rather than approaching their usual source of comfort, their owner, dogs sniffed, nuzzled and licked the stranger instead. The dogs’ pattern of response was behaviorally consistent with an expression of empathic concern.[16]
Domestic dogs are polygamous in contrast to wolves that are generally monogamous. Therefore, domestic dogs have no pair bonding and the protection of a single mate, but rather have multiple mates in a year. There is no paternal care in dogs as opposed to wolves where all pack members assist the mother with the pups. The consequence is that wolves put a lot of energy into producing a few pups in contrast to dogs that maximize the production of pups. This higher pup production rate enables dogs to maintain or even increase their population with a lower pup survival rate than wolves, and allows dogs a greater capacity than wolves to grow their population after a population crash or when entering a new habitat. It is proposed that these differences are an alternative breeding strategy adapted to a life of scavenging instead of hunting.[45] In contrast to domestic dogs, feral dogs are monogamous. Domestic dogs tend to have a litter size of 10, wolves 3, and feral dogs 5-8. Feral pups have a very high mortality rate with only 5% surviving at the age of one year, and sometimes the pups are left unattended making them vulnerable to predators.[38] Domestic dogs stand alone among all canids for a total lack of paternal care.[77]
Non-associative learning is a change in a response to a stimulus that does not involve associating the presented stimulus with another stimulus or event such as reward or punishment.[46] Habituation is non-associative learning. An example is where a dog that reacts excitedly to a door bell is subjected to repeated ringing without accompanying visitors, and stops reacting to the meaningless stimuli. It becomes habituated to the noise.[47] On the other side of habituation is sensitization. Some dogs' reactions to the stimuli become stronger instead of them habituating to the repeated stimuli or event.[48] Desensitization is the process of pairing positive experiences with an object, person, or situation that causes fear or anxiety.[49] Consistent exposure to the feared object in conjunction with rewards allows the animal to become less stressed, thereby becoming desensitized in the process. This type of training can be effective for dogs who are fearful of fireworks.[50]
Branded clothing is a great tool for companies that would like to build a team spirit among staff and we have a wide range of polo shirts, sportswear and work wear that can be customised with your company logo and name. These items can also be used as marketing gifts and when recipients in cities such as Canberra and Gold Coast wear them around town, they provide a great deal of exposure for a relatively small investment. If you want to promote your company across the country check out our range of personalised promo products and high quality corporate giveaways.
Many people have an irrational and mistaken belief that dogs should somehow know “naturally” how to behave well. The truth is that “behaving well” is a human concept: dogs can’t be expected to know the difference between “good” and “bad” behaviour. They need to be trained to behave in the way that their owners want them to behave, and this takes time, patience and commitment. Typically, an owner needs to spend around fifteen minutes a day training their dog (not necessarily all at once: five minutes three times a day may even work better). This needs to happen day after day, week after week, month after month. It can be combined with daily activities such as walks, but it needs to be done. You cannot expect a dog to learn how to behave if you don’t teach them with regular lessons.
The 1980 television series Training Dogs the Woodhouse Way made Barbara Woodhouse a household name in the UK, and the first international celebrity dog trainer.[25] Known for her "no bad dogs" philosophy, Woodhouse was highly critical of "bad owners", particularly those she saw as "overly sentimental".[26] She described the "psychoanalyzing of dogs" as "a lot of rubbish".[27] Her no-nonsense style made her a pop-culture icon, with her emphatic "sit" and catch cry of "walkies" becoming part of the popular vernacular.[28]
“One of the main reasons I chose a Bloodhound was because we love hiking and I wanted an active and athletic dog. Unfortunately, KC decided that he wanted to do his own explorations and on a couple of occasions I was left looking for him for over 2 hours – I really thought we’d lost him. Thanks to your training tips and advice KC really listens to me now and always comes when he is called now. Thanks!”
During the 1990s, Australia saw an increase in multiculturalism as companies from around the world came out with innovative marketing ideas. New events, products, and brands were frequently supplemented by personalised and branded promotional products. Now, in the Internet age, we are able to showcase a wide selection of promotional gifts that suit any business’ needs and budget.

Just a quick note of thanks. My one year old Golden Retriever dog was diagnosed with cataracts. My vet told me it would not be a good idea to breed her since it is probably a genetic defect. I did not want to breed a defective dog but found it hard to accept that a one year old dog could have cataracts. I went searching on the web and found this product Eye See Clearly I read about it and thought I would give it a try, well I am happy to report, after only a 1-1/2 weeks, it appears the cataracts on my dogs inner eyes have cleared up. I will be bringing my dog back to the vet to confirm my observation and give her a clean bill of health.
Rather than focusing on one single training philosophy or methodology, NDTF’s courses will introduce students to a wide range of training methods based on scientifically proven data and extensive research. The NDTF prides itself on providing a thorough and complete education, including canine communication and obedience training for dogs along with a balanced perspective on dog training techniques, equipment, ethical concerns, and canine welfare.
As a vet in practice, I meet hundreds of owners with their dogs every week; over the thirty years since I qualified, that’s a huge crowd of people and a massive pack of dogs. I have witnessed long standing clients having a series of animals: taking on puppies, rearing them through to old age and eventual death, then getting another dog and repeating the cycle. This continuity of care is one of the rewarding aspects of being a vet in a small community: you get to know several generations of people and animals.
During both courses, your dog will stay on-site at your nearest Dog Training Academy for 7 or 18 days, and will have dedicated access to their expert educator. Each day, they will receive one-on-one time with their trainer, and will be exposed to whatever situations they need help with - be it socialisation with other animals, basic obedience, or specific dog behaviours.
All of the wild members of the genus Canis display complex coordinated parental behaviors. Wolf pups are cared primarily by their mother for the first 3 months of their life when she remains in the den with them while they rely on her milk for sustenance and her presence for protection. The father brings her food. Once they leave the den and can chew, the parents and pups from previous years regurgitate food for them. Wolf pups become independent by 5 to 8 months, although they often stay with their parents for years. In contrast, dog pups are cared for by the mother and rely on her for milk and protection but she gets no help from the father nor other dogs. Once pups are weaned around 10 weeks they are independent and receive no further maternal care.[45]
Perfect for rural living, Maremma Sheepdogs are large, loyal and protective family pets that needs lots of mental stimulation. Affectionately known as gentle giants, Maremma Sheepdogs originated in Italy where their primary job was to guard flocks against wolves, bears and wild dogs. Maremma Sheepdogs are known for their self-reliant, independent and protective temperament. They …
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