Dogs often give subtle signs they are becoming anxious, like avoiding eye contact with whatever is worrying them, licking lips, brow furrows, lifting a paw or tightening muscles in their face. If nothing is done to help these dogs move away from whatever is worrying them, these signs can often escalate to more troubling behaviour that is more obvious, such as growling and snapping.
More commonly than often thought, problem dogs can cause issues with home-life both within the family and the dog itself. In these cases, it’s important to seek professional help to resolve or prevent the issue from reoccurring. Carrying expertise as a professional dog trainer and expert in canine aggression, Basil Theofanides is well-versed in dealing with problems like aggressiveness; which, when left unattended, can be severely detrimental.  Command Dog Training can assess the situation and devise an approach to dealing with this behaviour.
"The trainers at Boroondara are very experienced and understand what it takes to nurture a wonderful relationship between a dog and their humans. As well as group training they have helped us with private issues that have arisen with our dog. They have provided us with direction, encouragement and support. The best thing is that the dogs and their humans are always encouraged to work at their own pace and always with the best interest of their dog at heart.  We cannot recommend Boroondara Dog Training highly enough." - Angela and Hugo
To make it easier for you to book dog training, we've put together our Studious Pet Package - for dogs who love to learn new skills. As well as their accommodation, play time and meals, our Studious Pet Package includes daily one-on-one dog training lessons with a dedicated, on-site trainer. We'll spend time with you prior to your dog's arrival, getting to know which areas you need help with so that, when they arrive, we have a training plan designed to achieve your pet's desired outcomes.
Prior to the 1980s, Karen Pryor was a marine-mammal trainer who used Skinner's operant principles to teach dolphins and develop marine-mammal shows. In 1984, she published her book, Don't Shoot the Dog: The New Art of Teaching and Training, an explanation of operant-conditioning procedures written for the general public.[23] In the book Pryor explains why punishment as a way to get people to change often fails, and describes specific positive methods for changing the behaviour of husbands, children and pets.[33] Pryor's dog training materials and seminars showed how operant procedures can be used to provide training based on positive reinforcement of good behavior.[23] Pryor and Gary Wilkes introduced clicker training to dog trainers with a series of seminars in 1992 and 1993. Wilkes used aversives as well as rewards, and the philosophical differences soon ended the partnership.[34]
Do talk to your local veterinary clinic and their nurses and veterinarians who have a wealth of knowledge and can help refer you to correct information. Remember that whilst some people may have never taken their pet to obedience school, if their dog is well adjusted it is likely it did not happen by magic. They, or the previous owner would have put in copious hours of home training and daily obedience exercises over some time, often early in the dog’s life. But don’t forget, old dogs can still learn new tricks!
Whether you're looking for an awesome fitness partner or someone to cuddle up with on the couch, it's important to choose the right breed for your lifestyle. If you're struggling to make a decision, set aside a little time to do some homework. We've provided multiple articles filled with helpful information on breed characteristics, personality, living requirements and history. While each breed has a unique disposition, one is bound to be a perfect fit for you and your lifestyle.
A typical dog needs to be exercised for half an hour, twice daily. And being allowed out the back door to wander around the back garden does not count as exercise. Dogs need enough energetic, interesting exercise (visiting different places, meeting other animals, having the chance to run around off the leash). If they don’t get this, they end up frustrated, bored and prone to behaving badly.
The course has been successfully completed by literally thousands of students throughout Australia and Internationally and is suitable for people from all walks of life. Whether students wish to be involved with obedience training for dogs or simply want to further their own knowledge of animal psychology and behaviour, the 22214VIC Certificate III in Dog Behaviour and Training represents the wisest and most informed choice.
Just like humans, dogs learn what is right and wrong or socially acceptable from their peers.  If your dog is deprived of this vital learning experience they could become 'dog aggressive' or become a target of 'dog aggression' because they doesn't understand what is play and what isn't, what is allowed and what's not.  They will often miss out on a lot of play as they are unable to read the subtle body language that dogs use to communicate and can become nervous around other dogs as they fail to understand them. 
Taking your pup for walks in the park and down the street is a great way to introduce your puppy to the world, and to meet other dogs.  However, the best way to get some really concentrated socialisation is to go to a puppy socialisation class. These classes are often conducted by vets and trainers as well as dog groups.  They allow your pup to meet, greet and play with other puppies and young dogs.  It is also a great way to meet other dog owners and share information about good play areas and fun activities you can share with your pooch. It is always a good idea to make sure you socialise your dog with a wide range of dogs. You should ensure he meets big dogs, small dogs, young and old.  The more he meets and plays with, the more secure he will feel around different dogs later in life.  If he only gets to play with small dogs he is likely to become scared or upset around big dogs in the future.
From height and weight to exercise requirements, there are many physical characteristics and personality traits to consider when selecting a breed. If you want a large dog who is laid back and needs only 20 minutes of attention per day, then a Basset Hound or Leonberger could be a good match for you. Or if you prefer small dogs and want to boost your fitness level try a Jack Russell Terrier whose energy is very high and requires 40 minutes of exercise a day. Sift through our breed profiles to find a personality that matches yours.
“This app will teach you how to read, not only your dog but what ALL dogs are trying so hard to tell us. You’ll learn when they’re stressed, afraid or over-excited. You’ll learn the difference between aggression and assertive play or what a true confident dog looks like. Canine body language can be confusing, but with the help of Dog Decoder, you’ll understand any dog’s signals like a pro.”
In the 1980s veterinarian and animal behaviourist Ian Dunbar discovered that despite evidence on the peak learning periods in animals, few dog trainers worked with puppies before they were six months old.[25] Dunbar founded Sirius Dog Training, the first off-leash training program specifically for puppies, which emphasizes the importance of teaching bite inhibition, sociality, and other basic household manners, to dogs under six months of age.[31] Dunbar has written numerous books, and is known for his international seminar presentations and award-winning videos on puppy and dog behavior and training.[32]
Based on the principles of social learning, model-rival training uses a model, or a rival for attention, to demonstrate the desired behaviour.[65] The method was used by Irene Pepperberg to train Alex the African Grey Parrot to label a large number of objects. McKinley and Young undertook a pilot study on the applicability of a modified version of the model-rival method to the training of domestic dogs, noting that the dog's origins as a member of large and complex social groups promote observational learning. The model-rival training involved an interaction between the trainer, the dog, and a person acting as a model-rival, that is, a model for desired behaviour and a rival for the trainer's attention. In view of the dog, a dialogue concerning a particular toy commenced between the trainer and the model-rival. The trainer praised or scolded the model-rival depending on whether the model-rival had named the toy correctly. It was found that the performance times for completion of the task were similar for dogs trained with either operant conditioning or the model rival method. In addition, the total training time required for task completion was comparable for both methods.[66]

As your dog becomes older socialisation is still a vital ingredient in a healthy dogs life.  This is because it provides both physical and mental stimulation. When dogs play together they are able to exercise far better than when they play with us, as they are far more agile than we are and able to expel a lot more energy in a shorter period of time. 
We’ve been working with dogs and their families for over 25 years, perfecting a ‘whole picture’ approach to behavioural training called WhisperWise®. Our mission is to educate dog owners and dog handlers on the difference between behavioural responses and obedience, and to help them understand dog pack behaviours and dog psychology. Changing behaviour is about building a positive relationship, where everybody has a place, and everybody speaks the same language. Get that right and you’ll be on your way to achieving real harmony and happiness in your household. DogTech® behaviour training is available one-on-one or in groups.

Dog training is the application of behavior analysis which uses the environmental events of antecedents and consequences to modify the behavior of a dog, either for it to assist in specific activities or undertake particular tasks, or for it to participate effectively in contemporary domestic life. While training dogs for specific roles dates back to Roman times at least, the training of dogs to be compatible household pets developed with suburbanization in the 1950s.
Prior to the 1980s, Karen Pryor was a marine-mammal trainer who used Skinner's operant principles to teach dolphins and develop marine-mammal shows. In 1984, she published her book, Don't Shoot the Dog: The New Art of Teaching and Training, an explanation of operant-conditioning procedures written for the general public.[23] In the book Pryor explains why punishment as a way to get people to change often fails, and describes specific positive methods for changing the behaviour of husbands, children and pets.[33] Pryor's dog training materials and seminars showed how operant procedures can be used to provide training based on positive reinforcement of good behavior.[23] Pryor and Gary Wilkes introduced clicker training to dog trainers with a series of seminars in 1992 and 1993. Wilkes used aversives as well as rewards, and the philosophical differences soon ended the partnership.[34]
Most dog training programs use OUTDATED force and dominance techniques. This is proven NOT to work by the latest research. My methods are force-free and gentle. They rely on the latest science in dog behavior research to create a strong bond between you and your dog and create positive emotions in your dog as opposed to fearful ones. They only reinforce the behaviors you want.
There are various things to consider, according to Radke, aside from a dog just being a family-friendly breed. She recommends taking your own daily life into account. "Are you an active family who spends a lot of time hiking, running, and camping?" she asks. "Or do you tend to stay home cooking and enjoying movies? You will want to choose a dog whose temperament, size, and energy level best matches your family."
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