Female dogs have an estrous cycle that is nonseasonal and monestrus, i.e. there is only one estrus per estrous cycle. The interval between one estrus and another is, on average, seven months, however, this may range between 4 and 12 months. This interestrous period is not influenced by the photoperiod or pregnancy. The average duration of estrus is 9 days with spontaneous ovulation usually about 3 days after the onset of estrus.[44]
Ongoing assesment is crucial to achieving results and, prior to arrival, you'll be asked to complete a questionnaire on your dog's current behaviours. During their stay at our Academy, your dog will then be assessed regularly, with results sent through to you so you can gauge their progress. For dog's enrolled in our Short Stay Training, we recommend enrolling in ongoing group obedience training and, for those committing to our Training For Life course, we are happy to offer complementary obedience classes for life.
Most dogs, like most humans, end up resembling their parents, not just in appearance but also in behaviour. Personalities of animals, just like people, are strongly controlled by genetics. If both parents are calm, obedient, gentle dogs, the puppies are more likely to turn out well. But if even just one parent is a boisterous, mischievous bundle of energy, then it’s more likely that a pup will grow into a similar type of animal. My simplest advice to people looking for a puppy is to try to meet both parents of the dog that you are considering.
Resource guarding is exhibited by many canines, and is one of the most commonly reported behaviour issues to canine professionals.[50] It is seen when a dog uses specific behaviour patterns so that they can control access to an item, and the patterns are flexible when people are around.[51] If a canine places value on some resource (i.e. food, toys, etc.) they may attempt to guard it from other animals as well as people, which leads to behavioural problems if not treated. The guarding can show in many different ways from rapid ingestion of food to using the body to shield items. It manifests as aggressive behaviour including, but not limited to, growling, barking, or snapping. Some dogs will also resource guard their owners and can become aggressive if the behaviour is allowed to continue. Owners must learn to interpret their dog's body language in order to try to judge the dog's reaction, as visual signals are used (i.e. changes in body posture, facial expression, etc.) to communicate feeling and response.[50] These behaviours are commonly seen in shelter animals, most likely due to insecurities caused by a poor environment. Resource guarding is a concern since it can lead to aggression, but research has found that aggression over guarding can be contained by teaching the dog to drop the item they are guarding.[51]
Studies using an operant framework have indicated that humans can influence the behavior of dogs through food, petting and voice. Food and 20–30 seconds of petting maintained operant responding in dogs.[89] Some dogs will show a preference for petting once food is readily available, and dogs will remain in proximity to a person providing petting and show no satiation to that stimulus.[90] Petting alone was sufficient to maintain the operant response of military dogs to voice commands, and responses to basic obedience commands in all dogs increased when only vocal praise was provided for correct responses.[91]
Dominance is a descriptive term for the relationship between pairs of individuals. Among ethologists, dominance has been defined as ‘‘an attribute of the pattern of repeated, antagonistic interactions between two individuals, characterized by a consistent outcome in favor of the same dyad member and a default yielding response of its opponent rather than escalation. The status of the consistent winner is dominant and that of the loser subordinate.’’[34] Another definition is that a dominant animal has priority of access to resources.[34] Dominance is a relative attribute, not absolute; there is no reason to assume that a high-ranking individual in one group would also become high ranking if moved to another. Nor is there any good evidence that ‘‘dominance’’ is a lifelong character trait. Competitive behavior characterized by confident (e.g. growl, inhibited bite, stand over, stare at, chase, bark at) and submissive (e.g. crouch, avoid, displacement lick/yawn, run away) patterns exchanged.[35]
Operant conditioning (or instrumental conditioning) is a form of learning in which an individual's behavior is modified by its consequences. Two complementary motivations drive instrumental learning: the maximization of positive outcomes and minimization of aversive ones.[37] There are two ways in which behavior is reinforced or strengthened: positive reinforcement occurs when a behavior is strengthened by producing some desirable consequence; negative reinforcement occurs when a behavior is strengthened by avoiding some undesirable consequence. There are two ways in which behavior is decreased or weakened: negative punishment occurs when a behavior is weakened by not producing a reinforcing consequence; and positive punishment occurs when a behavior is weakened by producing a consequence that is a disincentive. In combination, these basic reinforcing and punishing contingencies provide four ways for modifying behavior.[38] Reinforcement increases the relative probability or frequency of the behavior it follows, while punishment decreases the relative probability or frequency of the behaviour it follows.
Despite claims that dogs show more human-like social cognition than wolves,[65][66][67] several recent studies have demonstrated that if wolves are properly socialized to humans and have the opportunity to interact with humans regularly, then they too can succeed on some human-guided cognitive tasks,[68][69][70][71][72] in some cases out-performing dogs at an individual level.[73] Similar to dogs, wolves can also follow more complex point types made with body parts other than the human arm and hand (e.g. elbow, knee, foot).[72] Both dogs and wolves have the cognitive capacity for prosocial behavior toward humans; however it is not guaranteed. For canids to perform well on traditional human-guided tasks (e.g. following the human point) both relevant lifetime experiences with humans - including socialization to humans during the critical period for social development - and opportunities to associate human body parts with certain outcomes (such as food being provided by human hands, a human throwing or kicking a ball, etc.) are required.[74]

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In less severe cases, obedience lessons are often required to give owners the confidence of handling their dog in everyday circumstances. To do this, we offer both basic and advanced levels, allowing you to strengthen the bond between you and your friend, and also gain the much-needed respect to ensure consistent, positive results in the future. This kind of dog training is important to establishing a level of control from the outset.
Whether you're looking for an awesome fitness partner or someone to cuddle up with on the couch, it's important to choose the right breed for your lifestyle. If you're struggling to make a decision, set aside a little time to do some homework. We've provided multiple articles filled with helpful information on breed characteristics, personality, living requirements and history. While each breed has a unique disposition, one is bound to be a perfect fit for you and your lifestyle.
Any advice provided is general only and may not be right for you. You should carefully read the relevant Product Disclosure Statement (PDS) to ensure the product is right for you. A copy of each PDS is available on this website or by contacting us. The Insurer for general insurance products (unless otherwise specified) is The Hollard Insurance Company Pty Ltd (ABN 78 090 584 473) and for all life insurance products is Hannover Life Re of Australasia Ltd (ABN 37 062 395 484). Your use of this website is subject to the website terms and conditions.
In recent years, scientists have realised that the impact of testosterone on dog behaviour is more nuanced: in a poorly socialised, timid dog, there’s a possibility that testosterone may have the useful effect of increasing a dog’s confidence. So for a dog with fear-based aggression, neutering could even make things worse. The right answer to the question “castrate or not” depends on the details of the individual dog, so if in doubt, it’s best to discuss this with your vet.
When we welcome a dog into our family we are making a commitment to their ongoing health and wellbeing - providing them with a safe and secure, loving home. But part of that commitment also comes in the form of teaching your dog how to act and behave to ensure they get the most out of life. At Hanrob Dog Training Academy we firmly believe that a well trained dog is a happier dog. Why? Because a well trained dog is given more freedom in life, requires fewer restrictions, receives more attention from family members and interacts better with other people and other dogs.
The statements made within this website have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These statements and the products of this company are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Any information contained on this site relating to various medical, health and fitness conditions of pets and their treatment is for informational purposes only and is not meant to be a substitute for the advice provided by your own veterinarian.
It is a common misconception that winning and losing games such as "tug-of-war" and "rough-and-tumble" can influence a dog's dominance relationship with humans. Rather, the way in which dogs play indicates their temperament and relationship with their owner. Dogs that play rough-and-tumble are more amenable and show lower separation anxiety than dogs which play other types of games, and dogs playing tug-of-war and "fetch" are more confident. Dogs which start the majority of games are less amenable and more likely to be aggressive.[14]
Ongoing assesment is crucial to achieving results and, prior to arrival, you'll be asked to complete a questionnaire on your dog's current behaviours. During their stay at our Academy, your dog will then be assessed regularly, with results sent through to you so you can gauge their progress. For dog's enrolled in our Short Stay Training, we recommend enrolling in ongoing group obedience training and, for those committing to our Training For Life course, we are happy to offer complementary obedience classes for life.
We have a massive reach when it comes to sourcing promotional items to suit a specific need, so if you can't find a product on our website then simply send us a picture of the product you require and we can source it for you, on top of that we can also design products from a simple idea or sketch and then bring them to life with our own in house manufacturing capability so talk to us about your requirements, our sales people are only too happy to assist.
As a vet in practice, I meet hundreds of owners with their dogs every week; over the thirty years since I qualified, that’s a huge crowd of people and a massive pack of dogs. I have witnessed long standing clients having a series of animals: taking on puppies, rearing them through to old age and eventual death, then getting another dog and repeating the cycle. This continuity of care is one of the rewarding aspects of being a vet in a small community: you get to know several generations of people and animals.
Any advice provided is general only and may not be right for you. You should carefully read the relevant Product Disclosure Statement (PDS) to ensure the product is right for you. A copy of each PDS is available on this website or by contacting us. The Insurer for general insurance products (unless otherwise specified) is The Hollard Insurance Company Pty Ltd (ABN 78 090 584 473) and for all life insurance products is Hannover Life Re of Australasia Ltd (ABN 37 062 395 484). Your use of this website is subject to the website terms and conditions.
Typical positive reinforcement events will satisfy some physiological or psychological need, so it can be food, a game, or a demonstration of affection. Different dogs will find different things reinforcing. Negative reinforcement occurs when a dog discovers that a particular response ends the presentation of an aversive stimulus. An aversive is anything that the dog does not like, such as verbal admonishment, or a tightened choke chain.[39]
The statements made within this website have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These statements and the products of this company are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Any information contained on this site relating to various medical, health and fitness conditions of pets and their treatment is for informational purposes only and is not meant to be a substitute for the advice provided by your own veterinarian.
Comparisons made within the wolf-like canids allow the identification of those behaviors that may have been inherited from common ancestry and those that may have been the result of domestication or other relatively recent environmental changes.[38] Studies of free-ranging African Basenjis and New Guinea Singing Dogs indicate that their behavioral and ecological traits were the result of environmental selection pressures or selective breeding choices and not the result of artificial selection imposed by humans.[54]
Perfect for rural living, Maremma Sheepdogs are large, loyal and protective family pets that needs lots of mental stimulation. Affectionately known as gentle giants, Maremma Sheepdogs originated in Italy where their primary job was to guard flocks against wolves, bears and wild dogs. Maremma Sheepdogs are known for their self-reliant, independent and protective temperament. They …
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