We call this training ‘etiquette’ rather than ‘obedience’. Sure, an obedient dog will do what it’s told. But a dog with good social etiquette often knows what to do without being told, and doesn’t require constant ‘rewards’. Etiquette is about applying dog psychology to establish a positive relationship with the dog – so it alters its behaviour naturally. When your dog understands its place in the household it’s less stressed and you can achieve real harmony.
Dogs reach sexual maturity and can reproduce during their first year in contrast to a wolf at two years. The female dog can bear another litter within 8 months of the last one. The canid genus is influenced by the photoperiod and generally reproduces in the springtime.[38] Domestic dogs are not reliant on seasonality for reproduction in contrast to the wolf, coyote, Australian dingo and African basenji that may have only one, seasonal, estrus each year.[44] Feral dogs are influenced by the photoperiod with around half of the breeding females mating in the springtime, which is thought to indicate an ancestral reproductive trait not overcome by domestication,[38] as can be inferred from wolves[75] and Cape hunting dogs.[76]
The critical period for socialization begins with walking and exploring the environment. Dog and wolf pups both develop the ability to see, hear and smell at 4 weeks of age. Dogs begin to explore the world around them at 4 weeks of age with these senses available to them, while wolves begin to explore at 2 weeks of age when they have the sense of smell but are functionally blind and deaf. The consequences of this is that more things are novel and frightening to wolf pups. The critical period for socialization closes with the avoidance of novelty, when the animal runs away from - rather than approaching and exploring - novel objects. For dogs this develops between 4 and 8 weeks of age. Wolves reach the end of the critical period after 6 weeks, after which it is not possible to socialize a wolf.[45]
I have often bought 'Eye See Clearly' on your website. It helps our dog, who is a five year old American Cocker Spaniel, very much. His eyes started getting white and cloudy about two years ago, before I started using your product. But after using it, they got better and now his eyes are clear and seem fine. I greatly appreciate your 'Eye See Clearly' and recommend it to my friends. Thank you for providing us with your great product.
Golden retrievers are a very popular family dog, because they're friendly, smart, and loyal. They're also known for their patience, Radke said, which is key for families with small children with grabby hands seeking out floppy ears to tug on. Goldens are also very playful, so they can keep up with the kids and wear them out for one big naptime with the whole family.
During both courses, your dog will stay on-site at your nearest Dog Training Academy for 7 or 18 days, and will have dedicated access to their expert educator. Each day, they will receive one-on-one time with their trainer, and will be exposed to whatever situations they need help with - be it socialisation with other animals, basic obedience, or specific dog behaviours.
Strictly following the model set out in the Koehler Method of Dog Training, some 50 years later, the Koehler method continues to be taught in both class and private training formats. The method is based in the philosophy that a dog acts on its right to choose its actions. Koehler explained that a dog's learned behavior is an act of choice based on its own learning experience. When those choices are influenced by the expectation of reward, the behavior will most likely be repeated, and when those choices are influenced by the anticipation of punishment, they will most likely cease. Once the dog has learned that its choices result in comfort or discomfort it can be taught to make the correct decisions. Action→Memory→Desire encapsulates the learning pattern used by the method; the dog acts, remembers the consequences, and forms the desire to repeat or avoid those consequences. Adherents believe that once the behavior has been correctly taught, it should be performed, thus making any correction, fair, reasonable, and expected.[57] While the model has been used consistently since 1962, some of the punishment procedures described in the book are now not considered necessary, humane, or appropriate by many trainers.[23]
When dogs are separated from humans, usually the owner, they often display behaviors which can be broken into the following four categories: exploratory behaviour, object play, destructive behaviour, and vocalization, and they are related to the canine's level of arousal.[47] These behaviours may manifest as destructiveness, fecal or urinary elimination, hypersalivation or vocalization among other things. Dogs from single-owner homes are approximately 2.5 times more likely to have separation anxiety compared to dogs from multiple-owner homes. Furthermore, sexually intact dogs are only one third as likely to have separation anxiety as neutered dogs. The sex of dogs and whether there is another pet in the home do not have an effect on separation anxiety.[48] It has been estimated that at least 14% of dogs examined at typical veterinary practices in the United States have shown signs of separation anxiety. Dogs that have been diagnosed with profound separation anxiety can be left alone for no more than minutes before they begin to panic and exhibit the behaviors associated with separation anxiety. Separation problems have been found to be linked to the dog's dependency on its owner, not because of disobedience.[47] In the absence of treatment, affected dogs are often relinquished to a humane society or shelter, abandoned, or euthanized.[49]

In the 1950s Blanche Saunders was a staunch advocate of pet-dog training, travelling throughout the U.S. to promote obedience classes.[15] In The Complete Book of Dog Obedience, she said, "Dogs learn by associating their act with a pleasing or displeasing result. They must be disciplined when they do wrong, but they must also be rewarded when they do right."[22] Negative reinforcement procedures played a key part in Saunders' method, primarily the jerking of the choke chain. The mantra taught to students was "Command! Jerk! Praise!" She felt that food should not be an ongoing reward, but that it was acceptable to use "a tidbit now and then to overcome a problem." Saunders perhaps began the shift away from military and police training methods, stressing repeatedly the importance of reinforcement for good behaviour in training—a move toward the positive training methods used today.[23]
Since 1994, Hanrob Dog Training Academy has not only been training dogs and their owners, but also educating the next generation of dog trainers and assisting government bodies train working dogs such as Detector Dogs. Our expertise in dog training is unrivalled, and our team of expert educators split their time between working with families like yours and with larger organisations, both in Australia and overseas. From puppies who need early guidance through to dogs with established problem behaviours, our educators have seen it all, and can quickly achieve results that last.
Unlike other domestic species which were primarily selected for production-related traits, dogs were initially selected for their behaviors.[57][58] In 2016, a study found that there were only 11 fixed genes that showed variation between wolves and dogs. These gene variations were unlikely to have been the result of natural evolution, and indicate selection on both morphology and behavior during dog domestication. These genes have been shown to affect the catecholamine synthesis pathway, with the majority of the genes affecting the fight-or-flight response[58][59] (i.e. selection for tameness), and emotional processing.[58] Dogs generally show reduced fear and aggression compared to wolves.[58][60] Some of these genes have been associated with aggression in some dog breeds, indicating their importance in both the initial domestication and then later in breed formation.[58]
In the UK between 2005 and 2013, there were 17 fatal dog attacks. In 2007-08 there were 4,611 hospital admissions due to dog attacks, which increased to 5,221 in 2008-09. It has been estimated that more than 200,000 people a year are bitten by dogs in England, with the annual cost to the National Health Service of treating injuries about £3 million.[98] A report published in 2014 stated there were 6,743 hospital admissions specifically caused by dog bites, a 5.8% increase from the 6,372 admissions in the previous 12 months.[99]

“Today’s dogs suffer from a lack of mental stimulation and quality time spent with “their” people. The resulting boredom and anxiety can lead to no end of physical and behavioral problems. Brain Training for Dogs is the solution! In a clear and concise manner, Adrienne Farricelli walks owners through a series of puzzles and exercises that will challenge and entertain dogs of all abilities.”
Tail chasing can be classified as a stereotypy. It falls under obsessive compulsive disorder, which is a neuropsychiatric disorder that can present in dogs as canine compulsive disorder.[52] In one clinical study on this potential behavioral problem, 18 tail-chasing terriers were given clomipramine orally at a dosage of 1 to 2 mg/kg (0.5 to 0.9 mg/lb) of body weight, every 12 hours. Three of the dogs required treatment at a slightly higher dosage range to control tail chasing, however, after 1 to 12 weeks of treatment, 9 of 12 dogs were reported to have a 75% or greater reduction in tail chasing.[53] Personality can also play a factor in tail chasing. Dogs who chase their tails have been found to be more shy than those who do not, and some dogs also show a lower level of response during tail chasing bouts.[52]
Domestic dogs are polygamous in contrast to wolves that are generally monogamous. Therefore, domestic dogs have no pair bonding and the protection of a single mate, but rather have multiple mates in a year. There is no paternal care in dogs as opposed to wolves where all pack members assist the mother with the pups. The consequence is that wolves put a lot of energy into producing a few pups in contrast to dogs that maximize the production of pups. This higher pup production rate enables dogs to maintain or even increase their population with a lower pup survival rate than wolves, and allows dogs a greater capacity than wolves to grow their population after a population crash or when entering a new habitat. It is proposed that these differences are an alternative breeding strategy adapted to a life of scavenging instead of hunting.[45] In contrast to domestic dogs, feral dogs are monogamous. Domestic dogs tend to have a litter size of 10, wolves 3, and feral dogs 5-8. Feral pups have a very high mortality rate with only 5% surviving at the age of one year, and sometimes the pups are left unattended making them vulnerable to predators.[38] Domestic dogs stand alone among all canids for a total lack of paternal care.[77]
Female dogs have an estrous cycle that is nonseasonal and monestrus, i.e. there is only one estrus per estrous cycle. The interval between one estrus and another is, on average, seven months, however, this may range between 4 and 12 months. This interestrous period is not influenced by the photoperiod or pregnancy. The average duration of estrus is 9 days with spontaneous ovulation usually about 3 days after the onset of estrus.[44]

“He understands every word”. “He knows when he has done wrong”. “He didn’t mean to bite”. Owners often make these statements in the belief that their dogs have a human-like ability to understand what’s going on around them. The truth is that dogs are dogs, and while they have a remarkable cognitive ability, they cannot understand the subtleties of human language, and they don’t live by a human moral code. If owners try to correct bad behaviour in dogs by treating them like mini humans, the problem will not be resolved.
We call this training ‘etiquette’ rather than ‘obedience’. Sure, an obedient dog will do what it’s told. But a dog with good social etiquette often knows what to do without being told, and doesn’t require constant ‘rewards’. Etiquette is about applying dog psychology to establish a positive relationship with the dog – so it alters its behaviour naturally. When your dog understands its place in the household it’s less stressed and you can achieve real harmony.
Free and unlimited personal email advice : Check this out... The price you pay includes unlimited, ongoing free support and advice by email. That’s right, you heard! I don’t just send you the book and abandon you. Oh no. You can email me anytime with any query you have about your Bloodhound’s health, training or behavior – as many times as you like - and I promise I’ll promptly get back to you. Let’s say you don’t quite understand something in the book, or the advice doesn’t seem to be working, simply drop me an email and I’ll do my very best to help you out. How’s that for service? And I tell you something, I don’t know of anyone else offering this level of customer satisfaction – anywhere!

Taking your pup for walks in the park and down the street is a great way to introduce your puppy to the world, and to meet other dogs.  However, the best way to get some really concentrated socialisation is to go to a puppy socialisation class. These classes are often conducted by vets and trainers as well as dog groups.  They allow your pup to meet, greet and play with other puppies and young dogs.  It is also a great way to meet other dog owners and share information about good play areas and fun activities you can share with your pooch. It is always a good idea to make sure you socialise your dog with a wide range of dogs. You should ensure he meets big dogs, small dogs, young and old.  The more he meets and plays with, the more secure he will feel around different dogs later in life.  If he only gets to play with small dogs he is likely to become scared or upset around big dogs in the future.

When dogs are separated from humans, usually the owner, they often display behaviors which can be broken into the following four categories: exploratory behaviour, object play, destructive behaviour, and vocalization, and they are related to the canine's level of arousal.[47] These behaviours may manifest as destructiveness, fecal or urinary elimination, hypersalivation or vocalization among other things. Dogs from single-owner homes are approximately 2.5 times more likely to have separation anxiety compared to dogs from multiple-owner homes. Furthermore, sexually intact dogs are only one third as likely to have separation anxiety as neutered dogs. The sex of dogs and whether there is another pet in the home do not have an effect on separation anxiety.[48] It has been estimated that at least 14% of dogs examined at typical veterinary practices in the United States have shown signs of separation anxiety. Dogs that have been diagnosed with profound separation anxiety can be left alone for no more than minutes before they begin to panic and exhibit the behaviors associated with separation anxiety. Separation problems have been found to be linked to the dog's dependency on its owner, not because of disobedience.[47] In the absence of treatment, affected dogs are often relinquished to a humane society or shelter, abandoned, or euthanized.[49]
Electronic training involves the use of an electric shock as an aversive. Common forms are collars which can be triggered remotely, or that are triggered by barking, fencing that delivers a shock when a dog wearing a special collar crosses a buried wire, and mats that can be placed on furniture to deliver a shock. Some aids deliver an aversive such as a spray of citronella when triggered.[61] The use of electric shock aversives for training dogs is the subject of considerable controversy. Supporters claim that the use of electronic devices allows training at a distance and the potential to eliminate self-rewarding behaviour, and point out that properly used, they have less risk of stress and injury than mechanical devices, such as choke chains. Opponents cite the risks of physical and psychological trauma associated with incorrect or abusive use.[62]

In 2012, a study found that dogs oriented toward their owner or a stranger more often when the person was pretending to cry than when they were talking or humming. When the stranger pretended to cry, rather than approaching their usual source of comfort, their owner, dogs sniffed, nuzzled and licked the stranger instead. The dogs’ pattern of response was behaviorally consistent with an expression of empathic concern.[16]

Money-back guarantee: you’ve already read some of the many testimonials from Bloodhound lovers like you who have followed the tips and techniques in my guide with amazing success: achieving happy, stress-free and rewarding relationships with their Bloodhounds. So here’s what I’d like you to do: I’m so confident that ‘Bloodhound Savvy’ will make a massive and positive impact on your Bloodhound that I want you to use the guide for yourself for 90 days with no risk whatsoever. That’s right! Try out the suggested training methods and solutions to behavioral problems with your Bloodhound and if they don’t work, or for some reason they’re not suitable, get you money automatically refunded in full – no questions asked.

From a young age, dogs engage in play with one another. Dog play is made up primarily of mock fights. It is believed that this behavior, which is most common in puppies, is training for important behaviors later in life. Play between puppies is not necessarily a 50:50 symmetry of dominant and submissive roles between the individuals; dogs who engage in greater rates of dominant behaviours (e.g. chasing, forcing partners down) at later ages also initiate play at higher rates. This could imply that winning during play becomes more important as puppies mature.[11]
And what I discovered from the dog trainers was a real surprise. You see, it turns out Shiba Inus aren’t always the easy option so many of us are led to believe. What I hadn’t realized is that Shiba Inus have distinct behavior patterns and that if these aren’t acknowledged, taken into account and dealt with in the right way, a Shiba Inu can quickly become a stubborn, destructive and hostile pet. I had been doing it all wrong – and I can’t tell you how guilty I felt.
×