Konrad Lorenz, an Austrian scientist who is regarded as developing the foundations of ethological research,[14] further popularised animal behaviorism with his books, Man Meets Dog and King Solomon's Ring.[15] Lorenz stated that there were three essential commands to teach a dog: "lie down" (stay where you are), "basket" (go over there) and "heel" (come with me).[16]

“Today’s dogs suffer from a lack of mental stimulation and quality time spent with “their” people. The resulting boredom and anxiety can lead to no end of physical and behavioral problems. Brain Training for Dogs is the solution! In a clear and concise manner, Adrienne Farricelli walks owners through a series of puzzles and exercises that will challenge and entertain dogs of all abilities.”

The term "observational learning" encompasses several closely related concepts: allelomimetic behavior or mimicking where, for example, puppies follow or copy others of their kind; social facilitation where the presence of another dog causes an increase in the intensity of a behavior; and local enhancement which includes pieces of social facilitation, mimicking, and trial-and-error learning, but is different from true observational learning in that the dog actively participates in the behavior in the presence of the other dog and/or other environmental cues.[53] Four necessary conditions for observational learning are: attention, retention, motivation, and production. That is, the dog must pay attention to the dog or person performing the modelled behavior; retain the information gathered about the behavior during the observation; be motivated to reproduce the behavior in a time and place removed from the original; and finally, produce the behavior, or some reasonable facsimile thereof.[53]

All of our course instructors have extensive experience and expertise in their specialised fields and are considered to be at the top of their expertise. These instructors include internationally experienced practitioners of obedience training for police and service dogs, Australia’s leading authorities on canine behaviour, veterinary surgeons, expert dog breeders, and highly qualified professional trainers.
Two dogs that are contesting possession of a highly valued resource for the first time, if one is in a state of emotional arousal, in pain; if reactivity is influenced by recent endocrine changes, or motivational states such as hunger, then the outcome of the interaction may be different than if none of these factors were present. Equally, the threshold at which aggression is shown may be influenced by a range of medical factors, or, in some cases, precipitated entirely by pathological disorders. Hence, the contextual and physiological factors present when two dogs first encounter each other may profoundly influence the long-term nature of the relationship between those dogs. The complexity of the factors involved in this type of learning means that dogs may develop different ‘‘expectations’’ about the likely response of another individual for each resource in a range of different situations. Puppies learn early not to challenge an older dog and this respect stays with them into adulthood. When adult animals meet for the first time, they have no expectations of the behavior of the other: they will both, therefore, be initially anxious and vigilant in this encounter (characterized by the tense body posture and sudden movements typically seen when two dogs first meet), until they start to be able to predict the responses of the other individual. The outcome of these early adult–adult interactions will be influenced by the specific factors present at the time of the initial encounters. As well as contextual and physiological factors, the previous experiences of each member of the dyad of other dogs will also influence their behavior.[35]
Many decades ago the majority of dog trainers relied upon force and correction as the sole method of training. Some trainers today still use methods based on the concept of ‘dominance’ and having to be a ‘pack leader’. However, such theories have been discredited, and the associated training methods are viewed as aversive by many progressive dog trainers and professional organisations.
Space used by feral dogs is not dissimilar from most other canids in that they use defined traditional areas (home ranges) that tend to be defended against intruders, and have core areas where most of their activities are undertaken. Urban domestic dogs have a home range of 2-61 hectares in contrast to a feral dogs home range of 58 square kilometers. Wolf home ranges vary from 78 square kilometers where prey is deer to 2.5 square kilometers at higher latitudes where prey is moose and caribou. Wolves will defend their territory based on prey abundance and pack density, however feral dogs will defend their home ranges all year. Where wolf ranges and feral dog ranges overlap, the feral dogs will site their core areas closer to human settlement.[38]
Resource guarding is exhibited by many canines, and is one of the most commonly reported behaviour issues to canine professionals.[50] It is seen when a dog uses specific behaviour patterns so that they can control access to an item, and the patterns are flexible when people are around.[51] If a canine places value on some resource (i.e. food, toys, etc.) they may attempt to guard it from other animals as well as people, which leads to behavioural problems if not treated. The guarding can show in many different ways from rapid ingestion of food to using the body to shield items. It manifests as aggressive behaviour including, but not limited to, growling, barking, or snapping. Some dogs will also resource guard their owners and can become aggressive if the behaviour is allowed to continue. Owners must learn to interpret their dog's body language in order to try to judge the dog's reaction, as visual signals are used (i.e. changes in body posture, facial expression, etc.) to communicate feeling and response.[50] These behaviours are commonly seen in shelter animals, most likely due to insecurities caused by a poor environment. Resource guarding is a concern since it can lead to aggression, but research has found that aggression over guarding can be contained by teaching the dog to drop the item they are guarding.[51]
And what I discovered from the dog trainers was a real surprise. You see, it turns out Shiba Inus aren’t always the easy option so many of us are led to believe. What I hadn’t realized is that Shiba Inus have distinct behavior patterns and that if these aren’t acknowledged, taken into account and dealt with in the right way, a Shiba Inu can quickly become a stubborn, destructive and hostile pet. I had been doing it all wrong – and I can’t tell you how guilty I felt.
Dogs often give subtle signs they are becoming anxious, like avoiding eye contact with whatever is worrying them, licking lips, brow furrows, lifting a paw or tightening muscles in their face. If nothing is done to help these dogs move away from whatever is worrying them, these signs can often escalate to more troubling behaviour that is more obvious, such as growling and snapping.
Clicker training is a nickname given to a positive reinforcement training system based on operant conditioning. Clicker training can also be referred to as marker training. The system uses conditioned reinforcers which are able to be delivered more quickly and more precisely than primary reinforcers such as food. The term 'clicker' comes from a small metal cricket adapted from a child's toy that the trainer uses to precisely mark the desired behavior; however, some trainers use a whistle, a word, or even a light as the conditioned reinforcer.[60] The trainer delivers a primary reinforcer, such as a toy or treat, after the noise or signal.
Your dog's educator will keep you informed of their progress throughout their stay at Hanrob, with reports sent through to you regularly. You will also be invited to attend an all-important departure lesson at the end of your dog's stay. This is not only a great opportunity to fill you in on your dog's progress, but is also a crucial part of the training, as our educators will give you the direction and tools you need to continue your dog's training where it matters most - in your day-to-day interactions in your home environment.
“Today’s dogs suffer from a lack of mental stimulation and quality time spent with “their” people. The resulting boredom and anxiety can lead to no end of physical and behavioral problems. Brain Training for Dogs is the solution! In a clear and concise manner, Adrienne Farricelli walks owners through a series of puzzles and exercises that will challenge and entertain dogs of all abilities.”
“This app will teach you how to read, not only your dog but what ALL dogs are trying so hard to tell us. You’ll learn when they’re stressed, afraid or over-excited. You’ll learn the difference between aggression and assertive play or what a true confident dog looks like. Canine body language can be confusing, but with the help of Dog Decoder, you’ll understand any dog’s signals like a pro.”
Most dogs, like most humans, end up resembling their parents, not just in appearance but also in behaviour. Personalities of animals, just like people, are strongly controlled by genetics. If both parents are calm, obedient, gentle dogs, the puppies are more likely to turn out well. But if even just one parent is a boisterous, mischievous bundle of energy, then it’s more likely that a pup will grow into a similar type of animal. My simplest advice to people looking for a puppy is to try to meet both parents of the dog that you are considering.
Animal behaviorists assert that using dominance to modify a behavior can suppress the behavior without addressing the underlying cause of the problem. It can exacerbate the problem and increase the dog's fear, anxiety, and aggression. Dogs that are subjected to repeated threats may react with aggression not because they are trying to be dominant, but because they feel threatened and afraid.[70]

Prior to the 1980s, Karen Pryor was a marine-mammal trainer who used Skinner's operant principles to teach dolphins and develop marine-mammal shows. In 1984, she published her book, Don't Shoot the Dog: The New Art of Teaching and Training, an explanation of operant-conditioning procedures written for the general public.[23] In the book Pryor explains why punishment as a way to get people to change often fails, and describes specific positive methods for changing the behaviour of husbands, children and pets.[33] Pryor's dog training materials and seminars showed how operant procedures can be used to provide training based on positive reinforcement of good behavior.[23] Pryor and Gary Wilkes introduced clicker training to dog trainers with a series of seminars in 1992 and 1993. Wilkes used aversives as well as rewards, and the philosophical differences soon ended the partnership.[34]
Among canids, packs are the social units that hunt, rear young and protect a communal territory as a stable group and their members are usually related.[61] Members of the feral dog group are usually not related. Feral dog groups are composed of a stable 2-6 members compared to the 2-15 member wolf pack whose size fluctuates with the availability of prey and reaches a maximum in winter time. The feral dog group consists of monogamous breeding pairs compared to the one breeding pair of the wolf pack. Agonistic behavior does not extend to the individual level and does not support a higher social structure compared to the ritualized agonistic behavior of the wolf pack that upholds its social structure. Feral pups have a very high mortality rate that adds little to the group size, with studies showing that adults are usually killed through accidents with humans, therefore other dogs need to be co-opted from villages to maintain stable group size.[38]
With extremely small and totally safe doses of different natural material (animal, mineral and herbal), one is able to stimulate the body's immune system against very specific immune body responses (such as conjunctivitis (eye infections); pain, coughing, sneezing, wheezing, and other allergic responses (asthma, bronchitis, discharges); seizures; constipation; diarrhea, etc. The way this works is similar to a vaccine or anti-allergy serum injection.
For dogs, pre-vaccination against distemper, hepatitis and parvovirus is required. A current vaccination certificate ( ie certifying that vaccination was done within the preceding 12 months and that the "due date" for the next vaccination has not passed) must be produced for each dog before admission. Vaccination against canine cough and checking for heartworm infection should be recommended prior to admission.

Going to obedience training every week gets you out and about meeting people from your neighbourhood and community. It helps you connect with others, socialise and often provides a friendship outlet or avenue to be involved in activities and events. Statistics show that people who have dogs are at a lower risk of physical and psychological health problems including lowered risk of cardiovascular disease, hypertension, loneliness and anxiety.


Many people have an irrational and mistaken belief that dogs should somehow know “naturally” how to behave well. The truth is that “behaving well” is a human concept: dogs can’t be expected to know the difference between “good” and “bad” behaviour. They need to be trained to behave in the way that their owners want them to behave, and this takes time, patience and commitment. Typically, an owner needs to spend around fifteen minutes a day training their dog (not necessarily all at once: five minutes three times a day may even work better). This needs to happen day after day, week after week, month after month. It can be combined with daily activities such as walks, but it needs to be done. You cannot expect a dog to learn how to behave if you don’t teach them with regular lessons.

Studies using an operant framework have indicated that humans can influence the behavior of dogs through food, petting and voice. Food and 20–30 seconds of petting maintained operant responding in dogs.[89] Some dogs will show a preference for petting once food is readily available, and dogs will remain in proximity to a person providing petting and show no satiation to that stimulus.[90] Petting alone was sufficient to maintain the operant response of military dogs to voice commands, and responses to basic obedience commands in all dogs increased when only vocal praise was provided for correct responses.[91]

Among canids, packs are the social units that hunt, rear young and protect a communal territory as a stable group and their members are usually related.[61] Members of the feral dog group are usually not related. Feral dog groups are composed of a stable 2-6 members compared to the 2-15 member wolf pack whose size fluctuates with the availability of prey and reaches a maximum in winter time. The feral dog group consists of monogamous breeding pairs compared to the one breeding pair of the wolf pack. Agonistic behavior does not extend to the individual level and does not support a higher social structure compared to the ritualized agonistic behavior of the wolf pack that upholds its social structure. Feral pups have a very high mortality rate that adds little to the group size, with studies showing that adults are usually killed through accidents with humans, therefore other dogs need to be co-opted from villages to maintain stable group size.[38]
Designed to give your dog the best possible start to their training, this course allows our trainers offers time to cover the foundations of dog training - from the basics right to your dog’s unique behavioural problems. For 18 days, your dog will stay and train with their dedicated educator, who is committed to helping your dog progress and overcome their individual challenges.
Rather than deciding to disobey us, dogs sometimes simply can’t do what we ask them to. Either they don’t actually know what we’re asking them to do, or they have much, much more pressing things to do at the time. Dogs are not great at generalising, so just because they sit nicely when asked to in the kitchen when you have treats in your hand doesn’t mean they automatically know what “sit” means when they are at the off-leash dog park.

A Hungarian dog training group called Népszigeti Kutyaiskola use a variation of model-rival training which they describe as the Mirror Method. The mirror method philosophy is that dogs instinctively learn by following the example of others in their social sphere. Core to the program is including the dog in all aspects of the owner's life and positive reinforcement of copying behaviors. Mirror method dog training relies on using a dog's natural instincts and inclinations rather than working against them.[67]


At the end of the day, it's also important to remember that your dog is just that: a dog. "Even the gentlest-mannered dog is still an animal with her own set of instincts and ways to express herself," Radke said. She suggests you never leave your small children unattended with the dog, just in case, and always supervise them when they're together. Your pup may always tolerate the ear and tail tugs from your kid, but you don't want to run the risk of the dog snapping one day when you aren't paying attention.
×