Dog training is the application of behavior analysis which uses the environmental events of antecedents and consequences to modify the behavior of a dog, either for it to assist in specific activities or undertake particular tasks, or for it to participate effectively in contemporary domestic life. While training dogs for specific roles dates back to Roman times at least, the training of dogs to be compatible household pets developed with suburbanization in the 1950s.
Barking, biting, chewing and many other common dog behavior problems are often misunderstood or mishandled by dog owners. Perhaps you are new to dog ownership, considering getting a dog, or just wish to better manage your dog. Thoroughly understanding the most common dog behavior problems is the first step to solving and preventing them. A solid foundation of obedience training will help you prevent or better control of these issues.
It is a common misconception that winning and losing games such as "tug-of-war" and "rough-and-tumble" can influence a dog's dominance relationship with humans. Rather, the way in which dogs play indicates their temperament and relationship with their owner. Dogs that play rough-and-tumble are more amenable and show lower separation anxiety than dogs which play other types of games, and dogs playing tug-of-war and "fetch" are more confident. Dogs which start the majority of games are less amenable and more likely to be aggressive.[14]
Many people have an irrational and mistaken belief that dogs should somehow know “naturally” how to behave well. The truth is that “behaving well” is a human concept: dogs can’t be expected to know the difference between “good” and “bad” behaviour. They need to be trained to behave in the way that their owners want them to behave, and this takes time, patience and commitment. Typically, an owner needs to spend around fifteen minutes a day training their dog (not necessarily all at once: five minutes three times a day may even work better). This needs to happen day after day, week after week, month after month. It can be combined with daily activities such as walks, but it needs to be done. You cannot expect a dog to learn how to behave if you don’t teach them with regular lessons.
There are various things to consider, according to Radke, aside from a dog just being a family-friendly breed. She recommends taking your own daily life into account. "Are you an active family who spends a lot of time hiking, running, and camping?" she asks. "Or do you tend to stay home cooking and enjoying movies? You will want to choose a dog whose temperament, size, and energy level best matches your family."

Whether you're looking for an awesome fitness partner or someone to cuddle up with on the couch, it's important to choose the right breed for your lifestyle. If you're struggling to make a decision, set aside a little time to do some homework. We've provided multiple articles filled with helpful information on breed characteristics, personality, living requirements and history. While each breed has a unique disposition, one is bound to be a perfect fit for you and your lifestyle.
Taking your pup for walks in the park and down the street is a great way to introduce your puppy to the world, and to meet other dogs.  However, the best way to get some really concentrated socialisation is to go to a puppy socialisation class. These classes are often conducted by vets and trainers as well as dog groups.  They allow your pup to meet, greet and play with other puppies and young dogs.  It is also a great way to meet other dog owners and share information about good play areas and fun activities you can share with your pooch. It is always a good idea to make sure you socialise your dog with a wide range of dogs. You should ensure he meets big dogs, small dogs, young and old.  The more he meets and plays with, the more secure he will feel around different dogs later in life.  If he only gets to play with small dogs he is likely to become scared or upset around big dogs in the future.
The female dog can bear another litter within 8 months of the previous one. Dogs are polygamous in contrast to wolves that are generally monogamous. Therefore, dogs have no pair bonding and the protection of a single mate, but rather have multiple mates in a year. The consequence is that wolves put a lot of energy into producing a few pups in contrast to dogs that maximize the production of pups. This higher pup production rate enables dogs to maintain or even increase their population with a lower pup survival rate than wolves, and allows dogs a greater capacity than wolves to grow their population after a population crash or when entering a new habitat. It is proposed that these differences are an alternative breeding strategy, one adapted to a life of scavenging instead of hunting.[45]
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